KEYNOTES

KAREN M’CLOSKEY
Thursday, April 13
12 PM
LA 279

Fabricating Landscapes

Karen will speak about the work and writing of PEG office of landscape + architecture focusing on how recent modes of visualization enabled through digital media have expanded our understanding of patterns as linked to processes and change over time. The ways in which we visualize—or fail to visualize—complexity and change means that we continue to rely on concepts and images of stability that remain grounded in a technological myth of controlling natural processes. At the same time, expanding technologies, in particular computers and computation are having a huge impact on how we understand complexity and change over time. The tension between these two “technologized” natures—control and complexity—provide fertile ground for exploration.

ANDREW CUSACK
Thursday, April 13
6 PM
LA 206

Design Thinking in Displacement

Description: After some initial context on the scope of humanitarian work and the state of displacement in the world today, we will discuss the value of a design education in humanitarian action. More specifically, I will highlight examples from my experience on how an education in architecture taught me an iterative, solutions oriented, client focused, environmentally aware design process that has helped me to guide action oriented solutions in support of conflict induced displaced people.

GENA WIRTH
Friday, April 14
12 PM
LA 115

Toward an Urban Ecology

Toward an Urban Ecology reconceives urban landscape design as a form of activism, demonstrating how to move beyond familiar and increasingly outmoded ways of thinking about environmental, urban, and social issues as separate domains; and advocates for the synthesis of practice to create a truly urban ecology. The lecture depicts a range of participatory and science-based strategies through the lens of SCAPE’s practice.

JAMES CASSIDY
Friday, April 14
6 PM
LA 278

Soil! – What it is & How it Works

It’s ALL about soil! Most people only have a vague idea of what soil is and how it works. You will learn more than you ever thought possible from this lecture. The reason you are alive, what nutrients are, how soil stores water and nutrients. The fundamentals that ALL humans on the planet Earth should know!

MIHO MAZEREEUW
Saturday, April 15
12 PM
LA 206

Resilient Futures

As climate induced extreme events and political instabilities exacerbate existing vulnerabilities, it is important to highlight ways in which we can all take part in defining our future. Through some recent projects in the Urban Risk Lab, this session will discuss the multiple ways, and scales we can engage.

EMMA MARRIS
Saturday, April 15
4 PM
LA 115

Placing Ourselves in Natural Spaces

Human categories of nature, wilderness, city, and countryside tend to divide the landscape into large zones of awareness; although cities are often fantastically biodiverse, we tend not to really see that nature as valuable or counting as ‘nature’ at all. Likewise, we tend not to notice extensive intentional and unintentional human manipulations of ‘natural’ areas like parks and designated wilderness. Our understanding of where nature is and how one ought to act in nature unwisely limits many people’s access to and connection to nature in a time when other species need champions and care. At the root of our displacement of ourselves from nature is the western divide between human and nature, a cultural dichotomy that never made much sense and is increasingly counterproductive in the “Anthropocene.”

AARON HUEY
Saturday, April 15
6 PM
LA 177

Displacement Through the Lens of a National Geographic Photographer

Photographer Aaron Huey will share a series of photo essays that speak to themes of displacement running through several of his National Geographic assignments. Over the past five years of work Huey has witnessed displacement of populations, language, faith, and culture from the Plains of South Dakota to the Himalaya of Nepal, from Trinidad and Tobago to the Caucus Mountains. This work offers an opportunity to look at how we communicate and respond to displaced regions and people.