LECTURES

Marcia Mcnally

Marcia Mcnally

Wednesday , April 10
Lawrence Hall 206 |  5 PM – 6 PM

THE POLITICS OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING: THE EXPERIENCE OF DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

This lecture examines the factors key to making decisions about affordable housing in Durham, North Carolina. In it McNally discusses how design acumen applies when one is a citizen advocate in the American South, and how rational planning and politics intersect in moving things forward. The “Durham way” is articulated through six interviews with policymakers, the author’s own experiences, and in the context of constructs such as rules for radicals, network
space, and urban regimes. She concludes with themes distilled from the interviews and reflects on what they offer planning and design thinking and practice.

Alan Ricks

Alan Ricks

Wednesday , April 10
Lawrence Hall 177 |  6 PM – 7 PM

JUSTICE IS BEAUTY 

Whatever we design, at whatever scale, we seek opportunities to break down social and environmental injustice, to fight inequality, and to change what we expect from architecture. It’s not merely that all people deserve a beautiful environment, or that a building that’s functional can also be beautiful, but that in order to be fully functional a building must be beautiful. Everyone has a right to design that improves their quality of life and is beautiful.

Dr. Deborah Brosnan

Dr. Deborah Brosnan

Thursday, April 11
Lawrence Hall 115 | 5 PM – 6 PM 

NATURE : LEVERAGE OR LIQUIDATE? THE CASE FOR ECOSYSTEM-BASED RESILIENCE

All human activity takes place on a natural landscape. We build our homes and communities on nature. By understanding the natural dynamics of ecosystems, we can choose to align with nature to create healthier and more resilient communities. This talk will focus on three elements: How natural ecosystems provide humans with a source of personal resilience using profound personal experiences to illustrate this element; How ecosystems dynamics and resilience are key to human sustainability; How we can learn from and align with nature to build resilient communities. By building with nature using green (natural) and gray (traditional engineering) infrastructure, we can build communities that are more resilient and that can adapt to the challenges of climate change.

Armando Azua-Bustos

Armando Azua-Bustos

Thursday , April 11
Lawrence Hall 115 | 6 PM – 7PM

A FEW OBSERVATIONS OF AN ASTROBIOLOGIST ON ARCHITECTURE 

Coming from the driest and oldest desert on Earth, I have lived in cities and I have seen places that are simply surreal. From what I have seen in the past in one of the most extreme environments on Earth, I will build on what will be required to live beyond Earth.

Randy Hester

Randy Hester

Friday, April 12
Lawrence Hall 115 |  10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

DESIGN FOR ECOLOGICAL DEMOCRACY

Every design action is a political act. Whose politic do you serve? Hester believes the only design that is worth doing serves mighty purposes like democratic resilience, environmental justice, biological and cultural diversity and everyday sacredness. Aesthetics emerge as meaningfulness. The world can never be more beautiful than it is just. In this lecture he introduces and defines the principles underlying ecological democracy. He illustrates with built work from his fifty years of professional practice. This work combines theory of social change of Martin Luther King, Jr. and ecological thinking from Aldo Leopold. Hester works interactively with communities, listening and arguing, facilitating and provoking to create inspired landscapes. He starts with the mundane to achieve the lofty. He calls up enough grassroots power to challenge virtual capital because change that counts requires redistribution of power. Design needs Venus Flytraps. Shrinking Violets need not apply.

Lauren Elachi

Lauren Elachi

Friday, April 12
Lawrence Hall 206 |12 PM – 1PM

THE SALTON SEA AND THE NAIROBI DAM – A PARABLE OF TWO PONDS

The Salton Sea and the Nairobi Dam are two water bodies in very different environments; however, they have some intriguing similarities and are inextricably linked to the issues of poverty and the need for participatory and equitable development in the surrounding communities. This presentation examines the work of Kounkuey Design Initiative (KDI), a non-profit community design organization based in Los Angeles and Nairobi, and uses these two “ponds” as an entry point to compare and contrast the wider development challenges in each place while providing solution for how to employ design and policy change championed by residents.

Pablo Unzueta

Pablo Unzueta

Friday, April 12
Lawrence Hall 206 |  5 PM – 6 PM

LOS ANGELES DYSTOPIA:  A VISUAL ANALYSIS ON CLASSISM AND INEQUALITY 

In a place where extreme wealth and poverty collide, globalization has taken its course in minimizing equal economic distribution; this includes the lack of investing in sustainable housing for low-income Angelenos. This presentation will share an alternative perspective regarding a city that is often overlooked for its sociological inequities. In addition, L.A. has become a focal ground for a growing Latino community where a dependency on the local businesses model is sustaining low-income communities.

Kevin Parkhurst and Hannah Wear

Kevin Parkhurst and Hannah Wear

Friday, April 12
Lawrence Hall 206 |  6 PM – 7 PM

CONSTRUCTIVE REALISM

In this talk, Kevin and Hannah will share various stories, projects and insights they’ve found working, living and envisioning a more sustainable future since they first began working together on the HOPES Conference in 1995 as students at the UO. They will talk about the beginnings and development of HOPES and some of the people that have been involved along the way. Projects they will touch upon include various Frank Lloyd Wright, Lloyd Wright and Eric Lloyd Wright projects they’ve been involved with and some of their own current work at the DIG offices.

Ronald Rael

Ronald Rael

Saturday, April 13
Portland, White Stag Room 350 | 11:45 AM – 1 PM

BORDERWALL AS ARCHITECTURE 

Borderwall as Architecture examines what the physical barrier that divides the United States of America from the United Mexican States is and could be. It is both a protest against the wall and a projection about its future. Through a series of propositions, Rael suggests that the nearly seven hundred miles of wall is an opportunity for economic and social development along the border that encourages its conceptual and physical dismantling. Rael proposes that despite the intended use of the wall, which is to keep people out and away, the wall is instead an attractor, engaging both sides in a common dialogue.